Christchurch Attack suspect Brenton Tarrant appears in court

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Sunday March 17, 2019 - 03:47:39 in News In English by Ali Adan
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    Christchurch Attack suspect Brenton Tarrant appears in court

    Waagacusub.com- The main suspect of killing 49 people in shootings at two mosques in New Zealand on Friday has appeared in court on a single murder charge.

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Waagacusub.com- The main suspect of killing 49 people in shootings at two mosques in New Zealand on Friday has appeared in court on a single murder charge. Australian Brenton Tarrant, 28, was brought to the dock in a white prison shirt and handcuffs. Further charges are expected to be made against him.

PM Jacinda Ardern said Mr Tarrant had five guns and a firearms licence, adding: "Our gun laws will change.”
Two others are in custody. None of those detained had a criminal record.
Mr Tarrant, who stood silently during the brief hearing, was remanded in custody without plea and is due to appear in court again on 5 April.

Ms Ardern called the attack "an act of terror”.

The first person to be publicly identified has been named as 71-year-old Daoud Nabi, originally from Afghanistan.

PM: He wanted to continue the attack

Ms Ardern said the guns used by the attacker appeared to have been modified, and that the suspect’s car was full of weapons, suggesting "his intention to continue with his attack”.
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Speaking at a news conference on Saturday, she said the suspect had obtained a gun licence in November 2017 that allowed him to buy the weapons used in the attack.

"The mere fact… that this individual had acquired a gun licence and acquired weapons of that range, then obviously I think people will be seeking change, and I’m committing to that.”

New Zealand’s Attorney-General David Parker said the government would look into banning semi-automatic weapons, but that no final decision had been made.

All day on Saturday the people of Christchurch have been turning out to show their rejection of the hate that inspired Friday’s horrific attacks.

In ones and twos and in family groups, people have been coming by the hundred to a makeshift memorial set up on the edge of Hagley Park. Outside the two mosques that were attacked, people have been laying more flowers. Many have left hand-written notes. "This is not New Zealand,” one read.
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At one point a group of young men started quietly singing a traditional Maori song, their heads bowed, eyes closed. The mayor of Christchurch said the killer had come to the city with hate in his heart, to perform an act of terrorism. But she said he did not represent anything about the city.

Still, there are lots of uncomfortable questions for the authorities here. The man now in custody, Brenton Tarrant, made no secret of his support for white supremacy. He had reportedly been planning the attacks for months. And yet he was not on any police watch list. He did not have any trouble getting a gun licence nor in buying a collection of high-powered weapons.

On Saturday, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said attempts had been made repeatedly to tighten New Zealand’s gun laws, but all had failed. After Friday’s terrible attack, she said, it must now happen.
The suspect had "travelled around the world with sporadic periods of time spent in New Zealand”, Prime Minister Ardern said, without formally identifying him.

Ms Ardern said New Zealand intelligence services had been stepping up investigations into far-right extremists, but added: "The individual charged with murder had not come to the attention of the intelligence community nor the police for extremism.”

Before the attacks, social media accounts in the name of Brenton Tarrant were used to post a lengthy, racist document in which the author identified the mosques that were later attacked.

The text is called "The Great Replacement”, a phrase that originated in France and has become a rallying cry for European anti-immigration extremists. The suspect said he had began planning an attack after visiting Europe in 2017 and being angered by events there.

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